Fakultet za sport i fizičko vaspitanje, 24.03.2020

Nova objava - 24.03.2020 12:15 Material fo ESL classes for 26th of March, 2020




1 Read the text carefully and complete the vocabulary exercise
Lewis Hamilton: Formula 1 world champion allays coronavirus concerns

Lewis Hamilton attended a WE Movement event earlier this month
Formula 1 world champion Lewis Hamilton says he has undergone a period of isolation after recently being pictured with actor Idris Elba, who has tested positive for coronavirus.
Hamilton, 35, was at an event in London earlier this month with Elba.
Sophie Grégoire Trudeau - wife of the Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau - was also in attendance and has been diagnosed with coronavirus.
"I want to let you know that I am doing well," Hamilton said in a statement.
 Coronavirus and F1: Delayed start or no season at all? What happens next?
The Mercedes driver added: "There has been speculation about my health, after I was at an event where two people later tested positive for coronavirus.
"I have zero symptoms and it has now been 17 days since I saw Sophie and Idris. I have been in touch with Idris and happy to hear he is OK.
"I did speak to my doctor and double checked if I needed to take a test but the truth is, there is a limited amount of tests available and there are people who need it more than I do, especially when I wasn't showing any symptoms at all."
Hamilton said that he had been in isolation since last Friday - shortly before last weekend's season-opening Australian Grand Prix was cancelled because of the pandemic.
The Formula 1 season has been delayed until at least the start of June, with several races either postponed or cancelled.
Taken from https://www.bbc.com/sport/formula1/51987464

Find the missing words in the text:

……………. (v.) diminish or put at rest (fear, suspicion, or worry).
……………. (v.) to cause worry to someone
……………. (n.) the process or fact of isolating or being isolated.
……………. (adv.)not long ago
……………. (ph) to be looked after
…………….. (v.) identify the nature of (an illness or other problem) by examination of the symptoms.
…………….(adj.) able to be used or obtained; at someone's disposal.
…………….(v.) postpone

2 Translate the text

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Grammar:
to be supposed to vs. to suppose

Suppose and supposed to are used very frequently in British English too. We shall see that suppose has a number of different meanings and uses and that supposed to is different again from suppose.
suppose = think/believe/imagine/expect
In this sense, suppose is often used in requests with negative structures when we hope the answer will be positive:
• I don’t suppose you could lend me your dinner jacket, could you? ~ Sure! When do you need it?
• I suppose it’s too late to see the doctor now, isn’t it? ~ Hold on. Let me see if I can fit you in.
• I don’t suppose I could see the doctor now, could I?~ I can fit you in at 11.30. Can you wait till then?







It is also used in short answers with the same meaning of think/believe/imagine/expect. Note that two forms of the negative are possible here:
• Will Jeremy be at Peter’s this evening? ~ I don’t think/suppose/imagine/expect so.
• Will you try to see Jennifer when you get back? ~ I think/suppose/imagine/expect not.
• Would you be prepared to stay on for an extra week? ~ I suppose/expect/guess so.
Note that suppose here describes a mental or emotional state, and it is not normally used in the continuous form.







Suppose/supposing = what if…?
Suppose or supposing can also be used in a quite different way instead of What if…? to introduce suggestions or to express fears. Compare the following and note that the verb that follows suppose or supposing can be in either present of past tense form:
• We haven’t got strawberry jam for the filling, so suppose / supposing we use(d) raspberry jam, would that be all right?
• Suppose / Supposing I come / came next Thursday rather than Wednesday, will / would that be all right?
• Will these shoes will be OK for tennis? ~ I don’t think so. Suppose / Supposing the court is wet and you slip(ped)?






be supposed to + infinitive = should
Supposed to in this sense means that something should be done because it is the law, the rule or the custom. However, in practice it is often not done:
• I’m supposed to tidy my room before I go to bed at night, but I always tidy it when I get up in the morning instead.
• In Germany you’re not supposed to walk on the grass in the parks, but in England you can.
• I’m supposed to return these books by Friday, but I’m not sure whether I can.
In the past tense, it is used to mean that something was planned or intended to happen, but did not happen. Note that in these examples, we can use should have as an alternative to was supposed to:
• I was supposed to go to Cuba for a conference last year but then I got ill and couldn’t go.
• Wasn’t Tom supposed to be here for lunch? I wonder what’s happened to him!
• I should have gone to Cuba for a conference last year but then I got ill and couldn’t go.
• Shouldn’t Tom have been here for lunch? I wonder what’s happened to him!
supposed to be = generally believed to be
Finally, we can use supposed to be in this sense:
• This stuff’s supposed to be good for stomach cramps. Why don’t you try it?
• The castle was supposed to be haunted, but I had a good night’s sleep there nevertheless!
When you are practising these examples in speech, note that the final d in supposed to is not pronounced. It is pronounced as 'suppose to', but should always be written in its correct form grammatically as supposed to.

Taken from https://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/grammar/learnit/learnitv152.shtml

 

 

Compete the exercise:
1. I don't you could lend me some money, could you?

2. I am not smoke here.This is a place for children.

3. you won the lottery, what would you buy?

4. I it will snow. Don't go out without a warm jacket.

5. I am be there before seven but I am often late.

6. When is your husband coming home? In March, I .

7. you inherited a lot of money. How would you spend it?

8. I was be at church yesterday, but I wasn't.

9. We are meet at eight.Can you hurry up?

10. You are stop at the stop sign.

11. Which questions do you would be asked in an interview?

12. I am to go there tomorrow morning.

13. It is to be the best shopping mall in our town.

14. You were to bring your camera.

15. You're not to bring your pet in this hotel.

16. I you have to undergo for surgery one more time.

17. I don't I could see her anymore.

18. We have no reason to that he has done something wrong.

19. He is the leader of that football game.

 

 

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